The View From 35000 ft…

Well, not literally… I didn’t get my normal window seat, but at least I am not scrunched in-between a couple of people and all their stuff. 767’s are good for that.

I’ve been thinking about the recent events, and love the preponderance of blogs, comments, posts, etc. about the action against bin Laden… to a point. Something in me started going real deep, and I found myself asking how I felt about the whole thing. How I continue to feel… I gotta tell you, it’s pretty weird to me. I do applaud the efforts of the military in completing the mission (you will notice through this that I am going to refrain from standard commentary, for a purpose). There is something to be said when those who claim resposibility for bad things are brought to justice. Again, applaud. However, as I sit here, literally at 35000 ft, watching my plane monitor tell me that the temperature outside the plane is a balmy -72 degrees (yes, that is minus 72…), I’m almost forced to look at the world, my world a little differently. So, I ask myself… how do I really feel?  Here, then is a download of some of my real feelings, in no particular order:

 – I hate the fact that we were even put in this situation. That there would be such an ability and willingness for a person/people to destroy the lives of others that we are forced to have to take such an action.

 – I hate that we as people in this world spend more time figuring out how to divide and destroy, rather than how to unite and build.

 – I detest the ease at which we can find money to build new jails, and in the same year fire teachers for lack of funds

 – I remember my first job, working in an amusement park. I had the wonderful task of working in the picnic area, where corporations and organizations would celebrate anything and everything over food, drink, and general fun. My colleagues and I spent the day cooking tons of hot dogs, hamburgers, fried chicken, corn on the cob and other such things, and always without fail, at the end of the day, there was food left over. We’re not talking about a couple plates – garbage cans full of food. On once such occasion, I filled up a 50 gallon garbage can full of perfectly good, freshly cooked corn on the cob, and was ordered to take it to, not the soup kitchen, or the rescue mission.., to the garbage! Outraged? Absolutely. People are starving, not only around the world, but in our backyard, and we would rather let them die than get involved and provide out of our surplus

I listened to President Obama’s speech, and was captured with the enormous task he was faced with. He could have made it about his presidency, about answering those who questioned his ability, etc. I admire the fact that he took time to honor the victims and families of 9/11 as well as the Muslim community. The other thing that I so appreciated about that night, and continue to do so, were all the posts and tweets thanking our military for risking their lives constantly for this operation, and every other time they put themselves in harms way, so we can be free to live and love and argue and fight and make up again. I wish they never had to do it. I hope that my son who is enlisted never has to see war, but if he does, I applaud him for what he is giving to not only me, but to his generation and every generation after him.

I’m sure there will continue to be news reports in the days to come about the minutia of the operation (they have already figured out who sent the first tweet in Pakistan when the helicopters came in… really?), but I’m pulling out of it. Not that it’s not momentous or important, and not because I am trying to be different, but because I think there is a more appropriate response now that it is done.

In the middle of my flight, I sit here glancing over people to peek out the windows every now and then. It looks peaceful. Beautiful. Majestic, if you will. Our world is vast, and colorful, complete with plains and mountains, rivers and deserts. Things and people that look, feel and sound different, but together produce a harmony, a collage, a masterpiece that appears so wonderful, at 35000 ft. To me, I take it as a sign. What can we do – I do – to help bring harmony to our world? To bring understanding where there are differences? To love, when the world wants to hate? I don’t have the answers… or do I? My eyes are open to the possibility, and I am willing. Maybe that’s the start.

What does the view look like for you? I’d love to look at it with you, to see the beauty you see, to experience the wonder of the world through your 35000 ft view.

one example of bringing harmony to our world is J’s Love Project. If you haven’t taken the challenge, now is a great time to start. You can click the banner to the right to learn more 🙂

14 Replies to “The View From 35000 ft…”

  1. Wow…just, wow! And that’s all for now, although I’ll return soon. Just one quick note: I felt nudged to write of this as well, so there’ll be another MMM this week, posted tomorrow sometime (does that make it a WMM?), explaining that it’s normal and human to express our emotions, but that we also are called to be more loving and gracious and to leave it all in God’s hands.

    Love you, brother mine!

    Like

    1. thanks sis. i’m finding a few more like-minded people in my writing community, people who are looking past the revelry and revenge factor to really aspire to full humanity. I look forward to seeing your post as well.

      Love you too

      Like

  2. Ken, thank you so much for posting this. I too, had been feeling such mixed emotions about the event and then I saw the Martin Luther King Jr quote on Facebook and it just resonated with me to my core – I had to repost it. It said it all for me! Your post does the same thing :^) Close to one of the last paragraphs that starts “In the middle of my flight…” was beautiful. “To love, when the world wants to hate…” love it!!

    Like

  3. “Things and people that look, feel and sound different, but together produce a harmony, a collage, a masterpiece that appears so wonderful, at 35000 ft.”

    Wow. That is beautiful. As are you.

    Like

  4. Perusing this again, brother mine, I was going to say I had nothing to add, yet I do. Although there’s much to comment upon throughout your post, these three things stand out to me:

    “President Obama…could have made it about his presidency, about answering those who questioned his ability, etc. I admire the fact that he took time to honor the victims and families of 9/11 as well as the Muslim community.” Yes; love that! I too felt the importance of honoring the Muslim community and tried to do so in my post. At the same time, I did not gloss over the atrocities committed by this one radical. I hope the respect shines through.

    “What can we do – I do – to help bring harmony to our world? To bring understanding where there are differences? To love, when the world wants to hate? I don’t have the answers… or do I? My eyes are open to the possibility, and I am willing.” Trite as it may sound, we may not have the answers but know the One who does. Normally, I hate Christianese but when something in life overwhelms me or is of a magnitude I cannot grasp, it calms my racing heart when I remember Who knows and is ready to help. It also opens my eyes to what I can do to help others.

    “What does the view look like for you? I’d love to look at it with you, to see the beauty you see, to experience the wonder of the world through your 35000 ft view.” Thank you for reminding us that we need a broader view, that we need to see from an elevation that brings our daily challenges into the molehill perspective that they ought to be. I love that!

    And I love so many other things about you! All of Heaven’s best….

    Like

  5. A beautiful and thoughtful post; it reminds me of the old song “From a Distance,” by Bette Midler, which I love but cannot listen to without tears! It’s so important to bring understanding where there are differences. Because from a distance, and in reality, we are so much more alike than we are different!

    Like

  6. When I think of Bin Laden’s death, I feel sadness, not only for the victim’s families, but for what was lost when this radical chose a violent way of life. Imagine how many people he could have helped, had he chosen a peaceful path. To think that God loved this man as much as He loves anyone else is a staggering thought. He loves the worst of us as much as He loves the best, yet the best of us aren’t any better than the worst. We all have flaws and weaknesses, but we all have the same chance at goodness and contentment as everyone else.

    Thank you for posting this! 🙂

    Like

So, what'cha thinking?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s